Book: Split at the Root – A Memoir on Transracial Adoption

Catana Tully explores questions of race, adoption and identity, not as the professor of cultural studies that she became, but as the Black child of German settlers in Guatemala who called her their “little Moor.”

You can find the book on amazon: Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity

Catana Tully is also an Adoption Couseling Expert–see more about her work at splitattheroot.com

Our Kids Are Becoming More Racially Diverse, But Our Cancer Treatments Aren’t Keeping Up

Flier being circulated to help Baylor find a bone marrow donor

Seven-year-old Baylor needs a multiracial bone marrow donor to hep treat his leukemia. But that’s easier said than done.

Only two percent of mixed race children find a match on the National Bone Marrow Donor Registry. Find out what’s being done (and what you can do about it): thinkprogress.org

Quote: “Peace is not merely a distant goal…”

In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – We celebrate!

“peace is not merely a distant goal that we seek, but a means by which we arrive at that goal.” ~ Martin Luther King Jr.

MLK-Quote

Visit our tribute last year for Daria music video and color pages to share with the little one’s in your life!

Enjoy!

Your friends at iCelebrateDiversity.com

“Like Us” on Facebook!

Video: Lesson in discrimination

Oh how I love this! I have seen the original exercise many times, however, PBS’s Frontline produced an amazing five part series you won’t want to miss!

Jane Elliott’s – Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Exercise – “A CLASS DIVIDED”

This is one of the most requested programs in FRONTLINE’s history. It is about an Iowa schoolteacher who, the day after Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered in 1968, gave her third-grade students a first-hand experience in the meaning of discrimination. This is the story of what she taught the children, and the impact that lesson had on their lives.

Watch the five part series:

The Daring Lesson

Day Two

14 Years Later

Teaching it to Adults

How the Adults Reacted

Jane Elliott is still around doing amazing work, check her out!

Happy Friday,

Your Friends at iCelebrateDiversity.com

Poem: I Am Invisible

I Am Invisible
~by Haley Thurman

I am invisible

I hate to be invisible

I am invisible

Do you think I am invisible?

I think you think I am invisible

You can’t see me

You can’t see Haley

I am a girl

I am biracial and half white

Is it the white in me you don’t like?

Is it my black that’s invisible to you?

I have brown hair and brown eyes

My lips are red

My shirt is yellow

But you don’t see me because I am invisible

Or are you blind?

This was originally on Oprah in November, 1999. Below is the video and interesting segment of being biracial in America (includes singer, Mariah Carey). Maybe we can get an update on Oprah’s #wherearetheynow.  I find it sad that there are still such negative comments written today…your thoughts?

Enjoy!

Your friends at iCelebrateDiversity.com

 

Music: Love is Color-blind by Sarah Connor

Good song! While in recent years the term “color-blind” has become a less favorable term by some (implying that color is something bad), the song is about love, unity and responsibility. Overall, great message!

[I do believe the creator of this video got a few words wrong…sorry, it’s the best version, with lyrics, that I could find]

“I Have a Dream” MLK Song, Colorpages and more

We LOVE Daria! Thank you for these wonderful resources!

We’re so happy to share this song that has been used in classrooms across the country to celebrate the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King. Below is a free mp3 of the song, lyric sheets, free sheet music and an animated children’s music video of the song.

“I Have a Dream” song – MP3

“I Have a Dream” song – Lyric Sheet

“I Have a Dream” song – Sheet Music

MLK_full-color_samplepage

MLK coloring page for younger children

MLK coloring page for older children

Definition: Biracial

Biracial: 1) Of, for, or consisting of members of two races.  2) Having parents of two different races. 3) refers to a person whose parents are of two different socially designated racial groups, for example: Black mother, White father. In a less commonly used, but equally accurate meaning, biracial can also refer to someone who has parents of the same socially designated race, when one or both parents are biracial or there is racial mixing in the family history that is important to the individual. This use of biracial moves us away from requiring “fractions of blood” to recognize the prevalence of racial blending throughout American history. However, the social and psychological experience of the person who uses the term this way may be different from someone who is a “first-generation” biracial.

Courtesy of the Mavin Foundation