Poem: “The Cold Within” by James Patrick Kinney

The Cold Within

by James Patrick Kinney

Six humans trapped by happenstance
in black and bitter cold
Each possessed a stick of wood,
Or so the story’s told.

Their dying fire in need of logs,
the first woman held hers back
For on the faces around the fire
She noticed one was black.

The next man looking ‘cross the way
Saw one not of his church
And couldn’t bring himself to give
The fire his stick of birch.

The third one sat in tattered clothes
He gave his coat a hitch,
Why should his log be put to use
To warm the idle rich?

The rich man just sat back and thought
Of the wealth he had in store,
And how to keep what he had earned
From the lazy, shiftless poor.

The black man’s face bespoke revenge
As the fire passed from his sight,
For all he saw in his stick of wood
Was a chance to spite the white.

And the last man of this forlorn group
Did naught except for gain,
Giving only to those who gave
Was how he played the game.

The logs held tight in death’s stilled hands
Was proof of human sin,
They didn’t die from the cold without,
They died from the cold within.

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“Race: Are we so different?” Part 5 – Does race matter in sports quiz

 

This quiz made me think of the movie “White Men Can’t Jump”. While I haven’t seen it in a LONG time, I remember the gist of it. White boys shocks everyone because he can play ball. Is it a stereotype that race plays a factor in how good of an athlete you are? Test your knowledege.

Surprised by anything?

We will continue to look at a couple more highlights from the exhibit “Race: Are we so different?”.  If you have missed any, you can catch up here: Part 1, Part 2Part 3 and Part 4. To learn more about this exhibit visit Understanding Race.

“Race: Are we so different?” Part 4 – Human variation quiz

Can scientists determine a person’s race by looking at their DNA?

Can experiencing racism lead to serious health consequences?

These are 2 of the 10 questions on the Human Variation Quiz. Run over and take it, I’ll wait…

How’d you do? Were you surprised by any of the answers? Tell us!

Stay tuned as we continue to look at a few more highlights from the exhibit “Race: Are we so different?”. If you missed our previous highlights, check them out: Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3. To learn more about this great exhibit visit Understanding Race.

“Race: Are we so different?” Part 3 – Who is white quiz

This is a continuation of our look at the “Race: Are we so different?” exhibit highlights. If you are just joining us, you might also want to check out Part 1 and Part 2.

Today I’m linking to the Who is White? quiz. Take it and see what you think. In her own words, this is why Vernellia Randall, Professor of Law, University of Dayton Law School, developed it:

I created this survey to help show that we make judgments not only about who is white but also about what countries are white (or predominantly white), and to call attention to some of the questions this raises.

For example, when someone is not considered white is a citizen of a country that is considered white, that person is often perceived as a foreigner. For instance, even though the families of many Japanese Americans have been in the U.S. much longer than the families of European Americans, they are often viewed as outsiders.

Our opinions about who is white and who is not can affect how we relate to one another. Race matters because discrimination based on perceived racial grouping continues to exist.”

Your thoughts?

To learn more about the exhibit, visit Understanding Race

“Race: Are we so different?” Part 2 – History of race

Today is Part 2 in the highlights of the traveling exhibit “Race: Are we so different?”. Check out Part 1 if you missed it.

Today let’s look at the history of race:

To learn more about the exhibit or dig deeper, visit Understanding Race

Dr. Laura’s Racist Remarks and My Response to Jade

Okay, so I have never been a fan of Dr. Laura Schlessinger (aka Dr. Laura). But, yesterday she made sure that I never will be.

Today she issued an apology and “hopes Jade will call back” so she can give her the help she needs (really?). I hope Dr. Laura gets the help SHE needs and spends some time examining her remarks and beliefs.

Jade, if you’re out there, here’s the answer you were looking for on dealing with friends and family who make racist remarks:

Communication is key. If you never share your feelings, they will never know they are offending you. Begin by believing the best in the person and stating so. “I’m sure you never intended to be hurtful, however…” 

Anticipate and rehearse. Take some time and prepare possible responses beforehand. This is good to do with your children too.

DARE – Here’s a great acronym to remember how to handle the situation.

Duplicate the offending statement (repeat verbatim): “When you said…”

Articulate how the statement made you feel: “I felt…”

Request a change in behavior: “I need for you to not make those types of statements in my presence anymore because…”

Explain consequences if the behavior is repeated: “If you continue to make these types of negative statements…”

Follow through! If you say that you will leave if “x” happens again, then follow through and leave the next time. And the next. And the next. If it is a friend, I would limit how many “next times” there will be before letting the friendship end. However, with family, I would prove to be the “bigger” person.

As for your husband, I would continue to keep the lines of communication open with him as well. I’m only guessing that he ignores the situations because he doesn’t know how to handle them either. Maybe the two of you could sit down and discuss some “anticipated responses” together. Don’t let race come between the two of you, let it be something that brings you together!

“Race: Are we so different?” Part 1 – Introduction

There is a traveling exhib that was developed by the American Anthropological Association, titled “Race: Are we so different?”. The exhibit examines racial issues through history, science, and experiences. This is a wonderful exhibit that offers a wealth of information. I thought it would be fun to highlight a few of my favorite parts of the exhibit over my next several posts.

Let’s start with an introduction to the exhibit:

To learn more about the exhibit or dig deeper, visit Understanding Race